ICEL

ICEL

[Press Release] Friends of The Court: Government Must Assess Climate Change Impacts of Celukan Bawang Power Plant Expansion

BALI / JAKARTA, 26 JUNE 2018 – Nine Indonesian and international environmental groups filed an amici curiae brief, or a friends of the court brief, to Denpasar Administrative Court (PTUN), specifically the judges who adjudicate the lawsuit against Celukan Bawang Coal Fired Power Plant expansion, Bali [1]. The project does not comply with the Environmental Protection and Environmental Law No.32 of 2009 and undermine Indonesia’s international climate commitment.

 

The 18-page brief stated that the expansion of the Celukan Bawang power plant does not include a comprehensive analysis of the climate change impacts in the decision making of issuing Celukan Bawang Power Plant’s environmental permit. In fact, the environmental permit should be based on environmental feasibility decisions and the Environmental Impact Assessment (AMDAL) that analyze comprehensively how the project impacts the environment [2]. This environmental impact should include the impacts of climate change.

 

“Amici believes that the legal obligations of Indonesia and the provisions in the Environmental Protection and Environmental Law and its derivatives provide sufficient grounds for the Judges to declare the Celukan Bawang Power Plant’s environmental permit null and void due to the lack of consideration for the climate change impacts of the project,” said Margaretha Quina, Head of Environmental Pollution Division of Indonesian Center for Environmental Law.

 

Indonesia has also ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and subsequent protocols, including Paris Agreement. Indonesia’s international climate commitment is also set forth in the NDC [3] which means that the obligation to mitigate climate change must be done on every development project.

Read more[Press Release] Friends of The Court: Government Must Assess Climate Change Impacts of Celukan Bawang Power Plant Expansion

[Press Release] The World’s Largest Mercury User: Is Indonesia Ready to Implement the Mercury Treaty?

On the 10th of October 2013, government representatives from 139 countries agreed to adopt the new mercury treaty, named the Minamata Convention on Mercury, in Kumamoto, Japan. As of today, 94 countries, including Indonesia, have signed the treaty and prepare to ratify it. The US is the first to ratify the treaty. The new treaty regulates the trade and distribution of mercury, restrict and eliminate the use of mercury in products and industrial process, mercury use in artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM), emissions control and releases to air, water and soil, management of wastes containing mercury and mercury storage, and remediation of mercury contaminated sites.

In a recently released UNEP study in January 2013, Global Mercury Assessment 2013, ASGM identified as the single largest source of mercury emissions from intentional use. In Indonesia, the highest sources of mercury emissions and releases are ASGM, oil and gas production, coal-fired plants, incinerations and open burning, and waste disposal. Based on the results of studies of mercury inventory in Indonesia in 2012, releases of mercury to the environment was around 339,250 kg Hg/year, about 59.37% was released into the air, about 15.5% was released into the water and about 14% released into soil/sediment. Approximately 57.5% of these emissions came from the ASGM sector with a total emission of about 195 tonnes/year or about 20% of total ASGM global emissions.

Read more[Press Release] The World’s Largest Mercury User: Is Indonesia Ready to Implement the Mercury Treaty?